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What Works for Me, When Working From Home

In preparing to write this article, I asked my friends and family members to send me their suggestions and experiences, good and bad, gathered from their Working From Home. Experiences.  I did not receive one single response!  I am guessing they had reached their Working From Home, cut-off point for the day,  when I sent my request to them; or I will receive their responses when I have completed this article.

Therefore, this is a small compilation of what works for me, when working from home.   I have experience Telecommuting full time, and Telecommuting part time while reporting into an office the other half of a week.  I have gathered  my Telecommuting experience professionally, by supporting the Non Clinical Health Care business in several different roles  and gathered Telecommuting  experience supporting Executives of a well known, international  Global Computer I/T and Sales Corporation.  I have experience working within a structured, defined remote workload parameter as well as a  flexible workload/time frame parameter.  It will depend on your own personal work experience, characteristics, personal work style and personality, which Remote expectations will work best for you.  What will make you most successful in any Work From Home position, will be you flexibility and ability to change directions quickly, even in the middle of your workflow; often in the middle of your work day.



















What Works for Me, Working From Home ?

*Having my Computer, I/T requirements in place before the Start Date!  Is the company you’re supporting sending you their PC Equipment/software/Web Cams/telephones?  Does your home have the required outlets, hard wired connections, ports or outlets connected prior to the equipment arriving at your front door? 

I make sure that my defined at home office/work space is organized and clean.  Messes are distracting.  Studies have proven that over time, your desk can collect more than 400 times the bacteria on your toilet seat….Yuck !!  

*I start my day as if I am going into an office.   Having a little breakfast; changing out of the PJ’s, (it really does make a difference) previewing what I need to accomplish that day before actually starting my work for the day.

* If you have a spouse, kids, relatives, pets; you should communicate your expectations with everyone who will be at home with you, during your working hours.

*I make a “To Do List” for the day.

*I structure  my day and work flow just the same as if I am are going into a physical office location.

* I do not look at the  Social Media sites…no matter how much I’m tempted, I don’t even go there !

*I do turn on the Television.  The television noise has proven to be effective in helping one to stay focused; especially channels with meditative music, history or religious channels. 

*I turn on the music.  Meditative, quiet music helps when you need to focus, upbeat , fast paced music does help when I need to move quicker, i.e.,; meet production goals.  Match your music to the task at hand.

*I personally commit to doing more that what is expected on any given day, even if I don’t reach that goal for that day.

*I work when I’m most effective…fortunately I can do that now…sometimes it’s early in the day, sometimes later in the day.  Work your high energy part of the day!  That changes sometimes, from day to day!

*I save telephone calls until the afternoon/late day hours.

*I take Breaks…get out of the Chair, Stretch, take a short walk, give my eyes frequent breaks from the computer screen.

*I try to get out of the House, take a short grocery trip, go to Starbucks, go to the local gas station for snacks, coffee, gas, etc….get out and interact with people!  Sometimes, I start preparing dinner little by little/dish by dish.

*I also use doing the Laundry as a timer. This too, makes me get up out of the chair and move around a little. 

*I attempt to develop relationships with other telecommuters.  Isolation has been my biggest personal challenge while Telecommuting/Working At Home.  I am a very sociable person who easily makes friends.  I do miss some of the “face to face” office/coworker friendships that you personally developed over the years.
 
*”Leave”  work at the end of the day.
 Just because you work from home doesn't mean you should be working all the time while you're home.

 
The Employer’s Perspective:

Why Corporations are finding Work From Home Positions Beneficial for Them

 Offering remote options is a “wise business strategy”

Organizations that offer flexible work options and embrace telecommuting have a competitive hiring edge over companies that require workers to report to a brick-and-mortar office for a set number of hours. 

Telecommuting options are a great recruitment tool

Employers seeking to recruit talent to maintain their competitive hiring edge are looking to flexibility. Working parents, retirees, and entrepreneurs are turning to work flexibility to achieve both career and personal goals.

Telecommuting saves money

From a real estate standpoint, telecommuting can save employers as much as $10,000 per employee by some estimates.  This statistic is backed up by research on the cost and benefits of work flexibility from Global Workplace Analytics, an organization that helps businesses and communities with workplace strategies.

Remote work is an option for employees across many industries and job functions

Technology and worker demand are just two of the factors driving the remote work trend. Companies that embrace telecommuting recognize the extent to which fast-moving technologies and the desire for work -life balance from employees of all ages have transformed the American workplace.

Telecommuting is a trend already well underway

Another way to say it: the telecommuting train has left the station. As noted in the ABC 7NEWS Denver television report, eight out of 10 employees reported that they already had worked from home, even just some of the time, at some point in the last year. Gallup’s “State of the American Workplace” report found that 43 percent of those surveyed already worked remotely at least some of the time in 2016, up from 39 percent just four years earlier.

At-home workers often are more productive

No distractions from workers in the next cubicle. No time-sucking water-cooler gossip. No gearing up to commute to the office and packing up to commute home. Data on the productivity of remote workers from Dell, a leader in remote work trends, illustrates the challenges that come with a virtual work force. The annual FlexJobs Super Survey found that 93 percent of workers surveyed said they stay home when they need to plow through work tasks and be at their most productive.

Home-based workers enjoy greater flexibility to stay healthy

Flexibility can offer workers more opportunities for integrating healthy habits into their remote lifestyles. The rigidity of some office-based positions often lend to more limited options to move throughout their workday. Remote workers who can set their own schedules may have more opportunities to get up and move throughout the course of the day, whether it’s doing tasks around the house, taking a gym break during off-hours (and avoiding the lunch-time rush), or staying active with their kids.

I hope all the previous information will help you determine if Telecommuting or a Work From Home position will benefit you personally and/or your preferred lifestyle!


​Author Jennifer A.

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